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Category — Extra Special Post

SCORE! Top 20 Film Scores of 2012 (pt. 1)

Welcome to IOC’s annual, year-end Top 20 Film Score Countdown! As always, the rules are simple – each score must feature original music composed by an individual (or team working together) for a Motion Picture. If there are compilation tracks included they must make up the minority of the disc. This eliminates certain soundtracks – like those of the documentary Searching for Sugar Man and Tarantino’s Django Unchainedbecause they feature tracks culled together from prerecorded material. Bummer. But get over it quick… ‘cos awwayy we go!
 

20.) ComplianceHeather McIntosh

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For writer/director Craig Zobel‘s tense workplace drama about a middle aged fast food manager (played superbly by Ann Dowd) who takes a prank caller too seriously, Zobel (one of the founding fathers of the awesome Homestar Runner website) enlisted Heather McIntosh, an Athens, GA cellist who’s worked with Circulatory System, The Instruments, Japancakes and Animal Collective to provide the atmospherics his narrative inspired by true events needed. Full of brooding cellos (natch), ringing vibraphone, a pulsing tempo and an overall ominous quality, McIntosh’s first soundtrack is a winner, a chamber piece which helps build the suspense while feeling as indie as the pedigree and subject matter would indicate. Have a listen.

Here’s track 1, “Compliance Theme”:

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Here’s track 3, “The Investigation”:

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19.) Low & ClearDoug Major

Low & Clear Original Score

This time it’s the score for this indie documentary about a duo of fly-fishermen friends directed by Kahlil Hudson & Tyler Hughen that’s got our attention, an eclectic affair that mixes banjo-like steel guitars with electronics to great effect. Pianos phase in and out, synths almost blow the speakers and wooden blocks join the fray to create a meditative yet melodic sound-scape full of surprises.

Here’s track 6, “J.T. Tracking Down the Canal”:

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Here’s track 21, “Xenie’s Theme”:

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18.) RealityAlexandre Desplat

Reality

Desplat was a busy man in 2012, giving us the score to Rise of the Guardians, Argo, Zero Dark Thirty, Rust and Bone, and of course pitching in memorable vignettes alongside the posthumous work of Benjamin Britten and others in Moonrise Kingdom, a fantastic compilation soundtrack which despite being ineligible for our list is a must-have for any discerning hipster. Here Alexandre crafts a lilting surreal score for a film by Gomorrah director Matteo Garrone. Featuring wind chimes, strings, and a choir of caroling voices straight out of Christmas and punctuated with bells a’la Danny Elfman on a subtle and restrained day. Pay close attention and you’ll spot some pipe organ, oboes and weird whirling electronic “chortling!”

Here’s the opening track, “Reality”:

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Here’s track 5, “L’Illusione”:

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17.) Hard Boiled SweetsTom E. Morrison

Hard Boiled Sweets

Writer-Director David L.G. Hughes’ hard-nosed British indie crime thriller gets a big boost from this exciting score full of loud guitar riffs, a choir of wordless angelic voices, and enough wah-wah pedals and effects to fill a high school basement. All this is spelled by some tension-filled ambient tracks featuring bleeping and blooping electronics, creating an overall score that’s truly unique – complete with track names like “Gobstopper,” “Fruit Bonbon” and “Chocolate Lime.” Must keep an eye on this composer!

Here’s track 1, “A Girl and a Gun”:

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Here’s track 13, “The Chocolate Lime”:

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16.) Mains ArméesSacha Di Manolo & Adrien Jolivet

mains armess

Frequent Luc Besson collaborator Pierre Jolivet‘s police thriller gets a haunting and propulsive soundtrack straight out of a Michael Mann movie, capturing that perfect 80’s late night atmosphere. Thick bass-lines and moody synthesizers build with hints of flamenco guitar peppered underneath, creating a familiar yet exotic backdrop. Singer Laetitia Bourgeois adds vocals to 2 tracks. Think Tangerine Dream by way of Ottmar Leibert – only endlessly better than how that sounds.

Here’s track 3, “Highway Lunch”:

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Here’s track 6, “Cocteau”:

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And so concludes part 1 of our celebration of the sounds of 2012. Tune in for part 2 later in the week – and check out last years’ countdown as well as the ridiculously ambitious and highly subjective countdown that started it all – our Top 150 scores of all time!

Oh yeah – and don’t forget to leave us a comment with your favorite soundtracks of the year… perhaps yours will make our list!?

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December 31, 2012   No Comments

Director Interview – JOSH JOHNSON

Filmmaker Josh Johnson sits down with our very own video clerk and resident tapehead, Rockie Juarez, to discuss his documentary Rewind This!, an ode to the VHS age:

Hey film fan – you may have heard a rumor floating around out there saying VHS is dead. I’m here to tell you you’re listening to the wrong people. Please allow me to aim your senses in a different direction – one that acknowledges the vital role VHS plays in pop and film culture history. I’d like you to meet a true believer in the format, a freedom fighter for VHS: the humble magnificent Josh Johnson. In the mere months I’ve known him, we’ve talked, seen (Jaws in 35mm!!), and eaten movies in a way that’s changed me forever. And as soon as I learned of his project – a documentary all about the mighty VHS format called Rewind This! – I knew I had to back it one hundred percent. Preserving the rich history of cinema and all the formats that have changed the way we ingest the sweet art should be a holy task of our Public schools, but seeing as how I’m not King of the World™, I figure I should teach the children through other channels – like this one you’ve come to at Isle of Cinema. So let’s jump right in and meet Josh, and learn about this important documentary! But before we do, just take a look at his picture – how can you not fall in love?

Josh Johnson

Hey Josh, thanks for taking time out of your day to rap with us about your amazing project. How’d it all start?  I imagine taking on a documentary has got to be a daunting task. There were two core ideas that really launched the project. The first was the realization that the story of home video and its impact has never been told on film. The other was the discovery of how many people were still buying VHS tapes on a regular basis because they contained rare content that wasn’t available by any other means. It seemed that there was an opportunity to construct a narrative about the significance of video that would show how we got where we are now and explore where we might be going. I started working with two partners on developing the project and we began small – by interviewing the relevant individuals that we had immediate access to in the Austin area. This enabled us to collect a significant amount of footage before the need to travel arose. Once we reached the point where we needed to start flying around the country to conduct interviews, we were far enough along that we were able to get support through local fundraisers. So while the scope of the project is daunting, there seems to be a lot of support for what we’re doing.

I’ve been in and out of video stores as far back as I remember, and I currently work at Vulcan Video in Austin, so personally this project speaks to me. And the masses agree – I saw you guys catch fire on the Twitter: was it overwhelming, seeing all that love, and was it a validation of what you guys were doing? Both. It is validating for sure and really encouraging to see that the audience for the film might be larger than we suspected. It’s also been completely overwhelming and emotional – the three of us working on this project frequently speak to each other in complete disbelief about how enthusiastic the response has been. This subject means a lot to us and we obviously assumed it would be meaningful to a certain segment of the populace but we clearly underestimated how many people feel passionately about the importance of home video. This process has been more rewarding than I ever could have imagined.

Click to check out Stephanie Vanelli’s print over at Etsy!

You mentioned your partners in crime on this project and their contributions. Yeah. Carolee Mitchell, who is acting as producer and Christopher Palmer, who is acting as co-director and both shoots and edits our footage. Since we’re a small team there are of course a variety of other roles that everyone has to step and fill on occasion as well.

Several big names were tweeting and spreading the word about it, too. Just so people have an idea, how fast did it take to hit your goal on Kickstarter? And who was your most “flattering” supporter? It took us 112 hours to reach our funding goal. We were expecting it to take the full 30 days but the response just exploded right away. The Kickstarter concluded about a week ago and we exceeded our goal by 53% which has enabled us to add two more production trips and at least 20 more interviews. I don’t know if there is anyone in particular that I would describe as the most flattering supporter but something that has been really satisfying is the broad range of people who have wanted to get involved. There is diverse spectrum of people from different continents and of different ages/backgrounds which I wouldn’t have anticipated.

I’m afraid tears of joy might soak my shirt if I perchance-d to gaze upon those numbers. As far as getting interviews, was it brutal locking down ‘celebs’ or were they on board from the get go? For the most part securing interviews has been fairly stress-free. In a lot of cases we had mutual friends who were able to put us in touch which is always helpful. We’ve also had a surprising amount of success reaching out to people through managers and agents. I think the main reason that the people we’ve contacted have been so receptive is that they are being offered a chance to preserve their own legacy. They contributed to a revolution that hasn’t received its due and our motivation is to acknowledge and celebrate their work. Something that a lot of people might not be aware of is that we haven’t paid for a single one of our interviews. Everybody who has agreed to participate has done so purely out of an interest in getting their story heard.

Hangin’ with the Troma team

So when can we see it!? I know that’s a rough question considering you’re still banging it out so I’ll rephrase that – what’s the projected release date? (Soon, I hope) Our final production trip is in May so we’ll be done filming at that point. We’re editing now so the film itself will be completed shortly thereafter. As for when people will see it that is less clear. We’re currently planning to show at film festivals with an eye towards distribution after that.

It’s going to be gangbusters at festivals. Not to jinx you, but I’d expect it to be picked up fairly quickly – valid subject with valid backers. Well Josh, I want to thank you for taking a minute to talk to me about a project so dear. How can all the interested parties out there follow your progress? In case they’d like to stalk you? Our website is www.rewindthismovie.com which should be getting revamped soon with a new look and more content. For day to day updates you can follow us on Twitter @RewindThisMovie. If you have too much time on your hands you can also follow my personal account(@VHSisthetruth) to learn more about what movies I’m watching, what desserts I’m enjoying, and what sort of awkward experiences I’m having with women.

Doin’ the VHS shuffle.

 

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March 5, 2012   1 Comment

SCORE! Top 20 Film Scores of 2011

Last year around this time we were just finishing up our mega-post on the top 150 movie soundtracks of all time – so as we pause a to reflect on what a fantastic year it’s been, let’s listen to what the films of 2011 sounded like… with our first annual top 20 film score countdown (let’s hope it sticks). And don’t forget to give us some feedback so we can grow brighter and better in 2012!

20.) RangoHans Zimmer

In a year that saw him also score Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows and Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Hans Zimmer takes us back to the Old West with a little help from Los Lobos and friends in this musical accompaniment to Gore Verbinski‘s animated film. A fun soundtrack that evokes Sergio Leone by way of Hunter S. Thompson – and uses the kid’s movie as an excuse to just make things even weirder. Here’s track 9, “Underground:”

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and track 11, “Rango and Beans:”

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19.) Another EarthFall on Your Sword

target=”_blank”>Fall on Your Sword? Whoever they are, they do a fantastic job creating a sci-fi atmosphere full of bloops and bleeps and some genuinely moving strings, fitting for writer-director Mike Cahill‘s psychological examination on the nature of reality and the universe. Here’s track 7, “The End of the World:”

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and track 12, “The Cosmonaut:”

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18.) Tinker Tailor Soldier SpyAlberto Iglesias

Alberto Iglesias’ other noteworthy score this year was Pedro Almodóvar‘s La Piel que Habito (The Skin I Live In), but this gets my nod for its wonderful mood, dark and tense with hints of adventure. A soft quiet score full of fantastic movement. Here’s track 4, “Islay Hotel:”

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and track 18, “One’s Gone:”

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17.) RubberMr. Oizo & Gaspard Augé

Also Known as Director Quentin Dupieux, Mr. Oizo brought us one of the year’s most unique (and most anticipated here at the Isle) bits of celluloid strangeness, in this surrealistic tale of a psychopathic tire on a killing spree in the middle of nowhere America. Though the film didn’t quite live up to our unrealistic expectations, the soundtrack does, thanks to clever sampling and some cool upbeat electronica. Here’s track 3, “Crows and Guts:”

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and track 12, “Polocaust:”

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16.) La Clé des ChampsBruno Coulais

IOC Favorite Bruno Coulais’s (who came in at 71 on our mega-post with his score for Himalaya) score for La clé des champs by the writer-director team of Claude Nuridsany & Marie Pérennou features some of the maestro’s inventive orchestration, as he teams up with French singer/songwriter Nosfell on tracks which weave vocals with bass clarinets and other goodness. Check out track 7, “Le lieu du rêve:”

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and with singer Rosemary Standley on track 19, “My Kingdom:”

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15.) Cave of Forgotten DreamsErnst Reijseger

Ernst Reisjeger is an incredible Avant-Garde Jazz cellist whom I got a chance to see play at the Bimhuis in the Netherlands one New Year’s Eve more than a decade ago. Now, on the eve of an entirely different new year, I find myself writing about his wonderful score for Werner Herzog’s 3-D documentary about the untouched scribblings of cave people on a wall in Southern France. Weird how shit goes down. Hypnotic, droning, and beautiful, it’s a score which helps Herzog tap into the ecstatic truth he’s constantly after. Here’s track 10, “Rockshelter Duo:”

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and track 15, “Forgotten Dreams #2:”

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14.) Cowboys & AliensHarry Gregson-Williams

At the IOC we loves ourselves a good ol’ action score, and this soundtrack to Jon Favreau‘s by-the-numbers Sci-Fi-slash-Western/James-Bond-meets-Indiana-Jones/based-on-a-comic-book tentpole is a fun variation on a familiar theme, with guitars and electronics weaving in and out of testosterone-inducing swells guaranteed to move its target demographic. Here’s the opening track, “Jake Lonergan:”

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and track 7, “Alien Air Attack:”

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and track 17, “See You Around:”

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13.) La Ligne DroitePatrick Doyle

A beautiful score to Régis Wargnier‘s film (also known as Straight Line) which brims with strings and evocative piano. Doyle had a busy year, providing scores for ThorJig, Man to Man and Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes. This is his personal best of  ’11. Check out track 1, “Leila Runs Free:”

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and track 5, “Training Games:”

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and track 19, “Through the Tunnel:”

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12.) HugoHoward Shore

Martin Scorsese‘s much-ballyhooed children’s movie and homage to Georges Méliès was a huge disappointment for this moviegoer, and further evidence the gifted auteur should steer away from sentimentality and stick to people blowing each other’s brains out. But there’s no doubt the score by the always dependable Howard Shore is a thing of beauty: measured, understated, lilting and always beautiful – like a slow waltz through a fantastic dream. Here’s the opening track, “The Thief:”

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and track 9, “The Movies:”

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and track 19, “The Magician:”

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11.) La Yeux de Sa MereGustavo Santaolalla

Also known as His Mother’s Eyes, Director Thierry Klifa‘s film benefits tremendously from this haunting score – featuring wailing cellos and eerie guitar, complete with scratching and distortion – composed by a gifted Argentinian composer who also gave us the soundtrack to this year’s Biutiful. Here’s the title track:

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and track 8, “Le Sourire De Maria:”

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and track 13, “Ma Mere:”

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10.) The BeaverMarcelo Zarvos

Jodie Foster stood by her buddy Mel Gibson and gave him the starring role in a movie that may have been too on-the-nose and self-reflexive for it’s own good, about “a troubled husband and executive who adopts a beaver hand-puppet as his sole means of communicating.” So was the movie The Beaver trying to actually be the Beaver within? Who knows – I didn’t go see it either. But composer Marcelo Zarvos, who also gave us the scores to Too Big to Fail and Beastly this year, acquits himself nicely with this intimate score which keeps things understated and quirkysomething I suspect the film failed to do. Here’s track 7, “Walter and Beaver Jogging:”

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and track 13, “Today Will Set You Free:”

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and track 17, the unfortunately named “The Beaver Becomes a Phenomenon:”

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9.) The EagleAtli Örvarsson

Icelandic composer Atli Örvarsson’s score to Kevin Macdonald‘s movie about two centurions who set out across Hadrian’s Wall into the uncharted highlands of Caledonia is fantastic, a self-assured and inventive affair which marries bagpipes with stringed dulcimers, string sections with ambient hums to create a hypnotic sound-scape at once both mysterious and beckoning. Makes me want to see the movie! Here’s tack 3, “The Return of the Eagle:”

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and track 6, “Honourable Discharge:”

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and track 13, “Better Angry Than Dead:”

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8.) HannaChemical Brothers

Joe Wright‘s action film about a preternaturally gifted assassin starring Saoirse Ronan, Cate Blanchett and Eric Bana marketed itself like a high-brow sprint across familiar ground – a feat greatly assisted by the participation of the Chemical Brothers – aka The Dust Brothers – who gained similar such cred from their score to David Fincher‘s 1999 Fight Club. This turns out to be an even better score. Here’s the opening track:

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and track 6, “The Forest:”

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and track 16, “Special Ops:”

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7.) The GuardCalexico

Writer-Director  John Michael McDonagh‘s fish-outta-water comedy about an Irish policeman who teams up with an uptight FBI agent to investigate an international drug-smuggling ring has several things going for it, including the presence of thesps Brendan Gleeson & Don Cheadle. The fact that indie darlings Calexico provided the score is just a plus. And the fact that it’s a great one – full of guitars, electronics, and hipster folk riffs – can only help! Check out the opening track, “Boyle Gets Dressed:”

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and track 7, “Into the West:”

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and track 17, “Good to Go:”

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6.) Girl with the Dragon TattooTrent Reznor & Atticus Ross

Being that last years’ The Social Network score won this duo the Oscar™- and given the fact that their version of Led Zeppelin‘s target=”_blank”>The Immigrant Song (featuring Karen O) was a year-long mainstay in people’s laptops thanks to an incredible first-person target=”_blank”>teaser trailer, all ears are now peeled for their latest collaboration with director David Fincher. Just released, it proves to live up to the hype – thanks to angst-filled melodies that crescendo into crunchy electronics, recalling Reznor’s NIN days. Take track 20, “You’re Here:”

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and track 28, “A Viable Construct:”

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and track 35, “A Pair of Doves:”

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5.) BellflowerJonathan Keevil

One of my big regrets this past SXSW was that I missed Evan Glodell‘s apocalyptic drama… and ever since hearing this score a few months back I’m even more amped to see it! Who is this guy Jonathan Keevil? I can’t find very much about him on the internet, so I’ll tell you my impressions upon hearing this soundtrack: the first half ranks up there with low-fi wunderkinds The Palace Brothers or Skip Spence‘s seminal Oar for sheer man-with-a-guitar-moody-goodness while the second half delves into nicely-produced electronics. In a word – a revelation! Check out the opening track, “Bland:”

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and track 6, “Dreadnought Sideroad:”

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and track 9, “Bracketflower:”

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4.) The Adventures of TintinJohn Williams

Guys like us on the Isle – who grew up on all things Star Wars/Jaws/Indiana Jones – have John Williams running through our brains just as sure as we have celluloid running through our veins. So it’s great to hear the master back with a score that’s fun, inventive, and most of all ALIVE! The intricately woven melodies, shifting rhythms, and fantastic orchestration – complete with clarinets, clavinets, bass drum punctuation and piano trills – not only capture the spirit of Hergé‘s legendary comics – but also invoke the sense of adventure and FUN which these sorts of movies should be about. Check out the opening track:

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and track 2, “Snowy’s theme:”

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and track 18, “The Adventure Continues:”

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3.) ContagionCliff Martinez

Cliff Martinez is no stranger to the top of our countdowns at IOC, his score for Kafka having charted at #7 in our previous soundtrack mega-post. And though Martinez’s score for Drive may have gained more airtime in trendy coffee shops and on listener’s iPod’s this year, this one – which reunites him with Director Steven Soderbergh – is the one I prefer: as moody and glitchy as it gets, and the perfect soundtrack for our impending doom! Reminding listeners to enjoy 2012 – it may be the last year we get! Check out track 8, “They Didn’t Touch Me:”

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and track 9, “There’s Nothing In There:”

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and track 20, “Affected Cities:”

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2.) Attack the BlockSteven Price & Basement Jaxx

One of my favorite movie-going experiences of 2011 was seeing Writer-Director Joe Cornish (credited as a writer on The Adventure of Tin Tin by the way) discuss his soon-to-be-cult-classic Attack the Block at SXSW (read my glowing review here). But before the man’s gracious Q and A charmed me, before his writing dazzled me and the special effects thrilled me it was the music that struck me – prompting one of those rare occurrences where I immediately rush home to seek out more info on the soundtrack. Check it out for yourself with track 1, “The Block:”

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and track 3, “Round Two Bruv”

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and track 20, “The Ends:”

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1.) NormanAndrew Bird

There’s some varying information available concerning this soundtrack’s release date, which some have as 2011 (the MP3 download I got from Amazon) while others have as 2012 (RYM) – all very ironic given that Jonathan Segal‘s movie came out in 2010! But regardless of vintage, what’s important is that it’s Andrew Bird – one of the true musical geniuses of the age. Seeing the man play – manipulating loop after loop of violin, layering incredible whistling over it, then singing over the vortex of sound – is like witnessing a real-life version of target=”_blank”>The Sorceror’s Apprentice from Fantasia, conducting a maelstrom of brooms in a castle. So a soundtrack which allows him to stretch his talents would be a score which would rise to the top of any year! Just check out track 2, “3:36:”

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and track 3, “Arcs and Coulombs:”

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and track 13, “Epic Sigh / The Python Connection:”

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There you have it! The sounds and sights of another year are over! Hope you’ll join us next year for more lovin’ of cinema on the Isle of Cinema. Have a happy and safe New Year’s!

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December 28, 2011   No Comments

20 FANTASTIC FINALES FROM FILMDOM (4 of 4)

If you’ve been following us for the last month and a half, you know that we partnered with BoxingUweBoll to bring you The TOP 20 CLOSING SCENES in film, as selected by the writers on both staffs. And today we bring you the final installment, numbers 1-5:

5.) Inception (2010) –  Christopher Nolan

[by Sean Carnegie]

The dream is over. Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) wakes up upon successfully completing the process of inception and walks dazedly through US customs, back to the home he once knew. Once he arrives at his house, he instinctively pulls out his totem and gives it a spin to reassure himself that he isn’t still dreaming. His attention is soon drawn away however, by the sight of his two children and as they rush into his arms the camera pans back to the now forgotten top. The music builds, the top wobbles and… Cut to black.
I have never heard so many theater goers simultaneously exhale in surprise at the ending of film as I did during that final cut of Inception. With this movie, Christopher Nolan built something as puzzlingly complex as a house of cards stuffed inside of a Russian nesting doll. All the way through my first viewing of the movie, I was convinced there was no possible way for him to land a satisfying ending after creating such a wonderfully complex narrative. Yet all it took was the slight wobbling of a top and a perfectly timed cut to knock the wind out of my lungs and set the internet on absolute fire with the question, “Is Cobb still dreaming”? Even though there have been millions of words spent on the subject, the bottom line is that the question is far more important than the answer. Nolan left the blank. It’s up to you to fill it.

[admin. note: embedding has once again been disabled – but please follow the link to see the ending.]

4.) The Thing (1982) – John Carpenter

[by Boaz Dror]

Carpenter’s soon-to-be-prequel’d remake of the Howard Hawks‘ classic begins with a bang and spends the entire 2nd act building suspense as an alien shape-shifter infiltrates a rag-tag pack of Alpha Males and wreaks havoc on their minds, bodies and souls. Against a harsh arctic landscape, the twists and turns hold increasingly higher stakes, as the fate of the world hangs in the balance. And though the eye-candy that fuels this film is Rob Bottin‘s amazing creature effects, the ending is as bare-bones as possible: having seemingly killed the creature, super-cool helicopter pilot R.J. MacReady (Kurt Russell) stumbles to what his final resting place by the camp’s flickering remains. Suddenly his rival Childs (Keith David) appears, “you the only one who made it?” the weight of his words filled with meaning. “Not the only one,” MacReady replies, insinuating what we’re all thinking. As Childs protests that he’s as human as the next guy, it occurs to us that the next guy – Mac himself – might not be so human. “Why don’t we just wait here a little while… see what happens.” Carpenter drops the curtain on the two men and freezes them figuratively in our minds before winter freezes them literally in their tracks, and whether we’re watching two combatant species or two of humanity’s unknown saviors, it’s a perfect ending to a movie in which no one is what he seems, and nothing can be trusted. It’s a delectably open-ended resolution to a masterpiece that won’t be topped anytime soon.

[admin. note: for a more in-depth review of the Thing look here.]

3.) The 400 Blows (1959) –  François Truffaut

[by David Micevic]

When Truffaut shot The 400 Blows, he was an outsider in the film industry, more than that, a hostile adversary—a fiery critic who famously wrote a call-to-arms deriding the stagnation he saw enveloping French cinema. At odds with the industry, by the famous final shot of his groundbreaking debut, he arguably now was the industry. With The 400 Blows he placed an indelible mark on the French film landscape, ushering in a new era of auteur cinema. To watch this scene in isolation doesn’t do it justice. It requires that you come to fully understand the plight of the film’s protagonist, renegade youth Antoine Doinel; to witness his persecution at the hands of authority figures, his eventual confinement in a juvenile detention center and his sudden escape from it all. If cinema, to paraphrase Godard, is not the station, but the train, Truffaut knew that his film needed to expresses that sense of endlessness. To convey the open-ended nature of Doinel’s journey, Truffaut employed a simple, but now-legendary cinematic technique. As Antoine makes his way onto the isolated beach, the camera zooms in on a freeze-frame of his face, and then the film abruptly ends. Truffaut leaves us with a haunting image of absolute uncertainty. There is no resolution; no reprieve. Antoine remains forever frozen in our minds, caught between the captivity of his past and the endless expanse of the unknown future.

2.) Chinatown (1974) –  Roman Polanski

[by Steven Short]

Although it’s remembered both for its technical dexterity and its unflinchingly bleak view of humanity, the ending to Chinatown is perhaps most revered for it astronomically high tragedy-per-minute ratio. In a scant five minutes, the hero is falsely arrested, his lady is shot in the head, a screaming child is carried away in the arms of an elderly pedophile, and the film’s main villain skulks away into the night. The gravity of the sequence is bolstered by a jarring lack of music, and an incorporation of eye-level shots and sparse editing lend the otherwise stylistically bold film an unpredictable, documentary-like feel. Through Polanski’s smart use of shaky P.O.V. shots, the viewer is standing right next to protagonist Jake Gittes as this shocking display of inhumanity unfolds. Everything Gittes has accomplished up until the film’s final moments has been for naught, and before all hope is extinguished a colleague mutters the famous phrase, “Forget it, Jake; it’s Chinatown.” As viewers we know those words have fallen on deaf ears, as his already dreary worldview was shaped by a similar incident in the past. He won’t forget Chinatown, and his compounded cynicism speaks to those of us who know the world can really be that bad.

1.) The Usual Suspects (1995)Bryan Singer

[by Boaz Dror]

There are gimmick endings and then there are outright shocks, culminations that cause us to question not only what came before but also the very nature of storytelling. The Usual Suspects, which pushes the concept of an unreliable narrator to dizzying heights, proves that “the bigger the lie, the more will believe it.” As smug agent Kujan (Chazz Palminteri) – with whom we’ve identified the entire film – bullies lowly Verbal Kint into finishing his account of Satanic Keyser Soze, we know his betrayal will earn him death. We pity Kint as he’s released, which is our undoing – for in the ensuing moments everything is transformed. Without Kint to lead him, Kujan finally sees the truth – and we see through his eyes. As Spacey shapeshifts from Kint to Soze in one of the greatest tracking shots in film, the audience’s collective jaw drops beyond the fourth wall. We realize we’ve not only been the victims of the greatest sleight of hand in film history, but that we’ve been active participants in our own undoing – we wanted this unbelievable tale-within-a-tale, of a mythical superman and a pathetic gimp, of colorful bad guys and outlandish double-crosses. And as Soze disappears forever, his greatest triumph is the one bit of fiction proven to be true: of his own greatness. Though as an audience we’re left exposed – swindled even – this fleeting fiction is an ultimate Truth we can cling to, a wisp of smoke in a hall of mirrors. The perfect ending to a perfect lie. And then – poof – it’s gone.

[admin. note: unfortunately, embedding has once again been disabled – but please follow the link to see the ending.]

What do you think? You agree/disagree? Either way, we hope you’ve enjoyed our countdown – be sure to revisit parts 12, 3, and to also visit Boxing Uwe Boll for the first installment, The countdown of the top 20 film openings! Please keep visiting both blogs for fantastic writing about movies, and look for more collaborations in the future! Thanks!

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August 8, 2011   3 Comments

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